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VOLUME 6 , ISSUE 4 ( Number, 2014 ) > List of Articles

CASE REPORT

Audiological Changes in Perilymph Fistula

Diptarka Bhattacharyya, Sobhana Chandran, Lubna Sayed

Citation Information : Bhattacharyya D, Chandran S, Sayed L. Audiological Changes in Perilymph Fistula. Int J Otorhinolaryngol Clin 2014; 6 (4):10-14.

DOI: 10.5005/aijoc-6-4-10

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 01-10-2014

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2014; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

Trauma is one of the commonest causes of perilymphatic fistulae. The classical patient presents with a sudden onset vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss, which may be fluctuating. The audiological changes can range from a purely conductive hearing loss, to mixed hearing losses (most common) to sensorineural hearing loss. The same are dependent on a number of factors, such as extent of trauma and perilymphatic leak, the presence of superadded infection, the tardiness in obtaining appropriate treatment, etc.

Materials and methods

A case of post-traumatic perilymphatic fistula has been presented here, and discussed with regards to the presentation, clinical diagnosis, treatment and the audiological profile and eventual outcome.

Conclusion

The audiological profile of a patient should be carefully correlated with the CT scan findings, the clinical picture as well as the intraoperative findings so as to predict and understand the eventual audiological outcome after treatment.

Abbreviations

dB: decibels, Hz: Hertz, KHz: Kilo hertz, BPPV: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Deg: degrees.


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