An International Journal of Otorhinolaryngology Clinics

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VOLUME 13 , ISSUE 2 ( May-August, 2021 ) > List of Articles

CASE REPORT

Migrating Fish Bone in the Neck Complicated with Neck Abscess

Tze Liang Loh, Adillah Lamry

Keywords : Abscess, Foreign body, Neck

Citation Information : Loh TL, Lamry A. Migrating Fish Bone in the Neck Complicated with Neck Abscess. Int J Otorhinolaryngol Clin 2021; 13 (2):58-60.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10003-1372

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 20-11-2021

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2021; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Accidental ingestion of fish bone followed by impaction within the upper aerodigestive tract is commonly seen in the practice of otorhinolaryngology (ORL) in Asia. When an impacted fish bone is not removed in a timely manner, a relatively unusual phenomenon of a migrating fish bone may occur leading to complications. We hereby present a case of migrating fish bone in a 42-year-old Chinese gentleman, which was complicated by an anterior neck abscess. He presented with the chief complaint of an anterior neck swelling associated with pus discharge and a preceding history of fish bone ingestion 3 weeks ago. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck revealed an anterior neck subcutaneous collection with a linear hyperdense foreign body seen within it. He subsequently underwent neck exploration surgery whereby the collection was drained and a long sharp serrated fish bone from within the collection was removed.


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